Threesology Research Journal
A New Communism
Revelation page 7

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Preface: A New Communism Preface page 2 Preface page 3

Communism and Societal Collapse

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ANC Revelation
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Present environmental conditions favor the usage of one another brand of Democracy, none of which are the practice of an actual "Peoples Government" in the greater sense of direct participation on a fully equal basis. The usage of force in an attempt to establish a Socialism or Communism has thus far proved to be both unsavory due to the lives lost and destruction which accompanies an attempted transition, and untenable given the present human preoccupation of resource allocation and means of distribution aligned with egotism and selfishness and not a selfless concern for the welfare and well being of all as a collectively unified philosophy of embraced practicality since so many institutions require a given type of obedience or else be ostracized.

Both individuals and collectivity of individuals practice attempts at transcending who and what they are. We can frequently find individuals whose day-to-day activities place them in routines by which one or more personal attributes can be enhanced, be it emotional (such as for stagecrafts), physical (such as some sport), or intellectual (such as being creative, insightful, gaining wisdom, pursuing an academic orientation, etc...). An individual may well be experiencing a transcendent development over a previous self— which includes others in their social setting— which may bring the attention of one or more others who what to assist them or even undermine them. An individual at this point may or may not become aware that their activities have created conditions by which an attribute of theirs has become enhanced. Upon recognition thereof, an increase in one or more activities (while an increased deprivation in others) may be pursued because it is initially thought that a particular activity is that which is most important in the development of the attribute.

This may or may not be the case and may set the person up to think that they can achieve some point of expression that is superior to most or even all others (such as some who engage in a combative sport). Such a situation may be viewed in terms of Narcissism in which a god-like impression is suggested, albeit tempered by any standard of humility a person may think they have and exhibit. However, if the results for an intensified effort is not as forthcoming as one had hoped or imagined, they may seek alternative sources of information to assist them in their efforts, though they may not know exactly what they are on the trail of in some cases. While some musicians may pursue the "perfect note" or some artist the penultimate masterpiece to overshadow all other artists, and some mathematician may seek to create a new math or a visionary some new path; there comes a point where the individual may ask themselves what next to do, where next to go... and how do they get there? If one deprivation activity (celibacy, vegetarianism, abstention....) does not create the conditions for an enhancement of efforts, they may well try the opposite thereof such as an alternative sexuality orientation by which their senses are thus aroused and most often become confused with some supposed liberation of consciousness by not being constrained by some supposed convention of activity.

One's behavior to create conditions for what a person may believe or present themselves with a hint of is the act of championing the underdog. Likewise do we need to now consider a similarity of behavior that can occur collectively in a society. In such a case, like the individual, a society may embrace the practices of day-to-day activities which help multiple people acquire an abundance (very often described in financial terms associated with an emotional, physical or intellectual activity). This abundance is collectively translated in a muted language (like that practiced in primitive gatherings) as some revelatory experience that has helped everyone acquire a transcendence (again, typically described in economic terms), whereby acts of indulging what are believed to be handicapped individuals (or groups thereof such as those with down syndrome or the Lgbtq) becomes the standard practice and expectation of the group as an expression of humility and charity defined as a characterization of the experienced "wealth"; but eventually comes face to face with the reality of asking whether or not such an indulgence is at all beneficial to the collectivity, or is but a burden... a distraction from applying one's total energies and resources towards achieving a greater enhancement. Such indulgences eventually become questioned and may even be seen as an unwelcomed interference.

Indeed, how far could a social collectivity progress if their limited resources and energies were not partitioned into the assistance of those who were not contributing to the whole? Thus, the idea of what "contributing" needs to be defined in context with the stated goal, and whether the goal can be achieved with or without the partitioning of "funds" (social deferments, allowances, indulgements) in the direction of such handicapped people. Could humanity's greater collective and individual transcendence occur better if such handicapped people as the Down Syndrome and Lgbtq were absent from existence? Would the black race(s) be better off if all other races were absent, or is the progress of Blacks only measured when it is set in the context of White activity? Would the collective transcendence of Native Americans have achieved more if there were no other peoples on the planet to have come in contact with? And how about the Chinese? Would any existing impulse towards a collective transcendence be able to express itself if all other peoples were vacated from the Earth? And if we cast the same questions upon the presence of any race or individualized group, let us also ask if there even exists an underlying goal of transcendence not defined by some religion or metaphysical philosophy? Is the supposition that theologians call Heaven a reality or a mere fantasy indulged in by those who have little interest in pursuing any activity other than an adulterated mediocrity to be used to manipulate others to provide for their desired sustenance to be indulged in inside a structure built for a supposed god that they are most privy to and deny the larger masses of homeless from occupy as part of the presumed charity, humility and selfless servitude often claimed?

If we can make a claim for some underlying instinct, drive, or orientation to be described as a disposition towards achieving some transcendence... some optimal character to be achieve both individually and collectively and labeled by some as paradise, utopia, shrangrala and multiple other alternative illustrations of contemplation; let us ask whether or not humanity also speaks of such an internalized "program" or "coding" by way of those expressive means available to one in a given era of their life span? For example, is there a map to Heaven or to Enlightenment or some Epiphenomenal state of being, but the present descriptions given by theologians, by philosophers, by transcendatlists, by gurus and their counter-parts throughout the world, are fragmentations there of? Does the artwork the music, the magic tricks, the scriptures, the theses, the etchings, carvings, spoken and unspoken words, feeling and thoughts of humanity display tell-tale signs that have not been correctly deciphered and present us with stumbling blocks, detours and otherwise dead ends which create conditions by which some seek assistance and formulate a confabulation of a spirit guide who can help to translate the supposed hidden, secret, mysterious knowledge, wisdom and vision of that which somehow existed in the past but is now appreciably vacant amongst present day peoples because they supposedly have lost touch with the assumed primal, the assumed basic, the assumed fundamental, the assumed nativist, natural, pristine, primordial message of the cosmos, of the Earth, of that which humanity is part of and compelled to unite with (to become one with, such as the religious discourse of become one with god) but is not clearly defined or only defined in terms applied to a genre of sociability that provides for some measure of societal control under the behest of those who typically are not visionary such as theologians and other professed spiritual leaders; though spirituality in past primitive ages did constitute a transcendent model of imagery in primitive contexts with a largely illiterate and naive populace?

And that this message is thought by some to be expressed in vibrations, musical notes, numerical indices, geometrical configurations, magnetic field fluctuations, electro-magnetic pulsations and other-wise non-word utterances which repeat in a sequence, a pattern, a formulation that the human spectrum of perception can not readily perceive but has the potential for doing so if it can learn how to train itself... yet all present day methods of training are both short-sighted and truncated exercises that lead one to a staircase but also impresses upon the individual to take a number and wait for the staircase to begin moving before advancing forward?

Contemplations of transcendentalism can lead to practical applications for improving the lives of millions. In Adopting the idea for a "New Communism", it is an effort to establish a venue of consideration that has not been traversed and needs to be identified with a prominent mile marker. Present forms of Communism, Democracy, Socialism and other political orientations are philosophies with old markers set up. While some revere such markers, their reverence often leads to the erection of barricades, fences with barbed wire and highly guarded edifices that you are permitted to admire from afar, but can not participate in the maintenance of nor come into direct contact with in order to get a first hand look at the present state of being. As such, must people remain disenfranchised from the larger proportionment of an assumed "self-governance". Nonetheless, let us look at the valuable practicalities which can arise out of a transcendental orientation. Note the time period which coincides with the transcendtalisms, occultisms, mysticisms and the like of Europe during the same time period, giving rise to the question of what caused the phenomena and whether a similar event will come again, and whether we can tabulate smaller social expressions thereof in different time periods that have not given rise to historical pronouncements of analogical consideration:

(In America, Transcendentalism was a) 19th-century movement of writers and philosophers in New England who were loosely bound together by adherence to an idealistic system of thought based on a belief in the essential unity of all creation, the innate goodness of man, and the supremacy of insight over logic and experience for the revelation of the deepest truths. German transcendentalism (especially as it was refracted by Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Thomas Carlyle), Platonism and Neoplatonism, the Indian and Chinese scriptures, and the writings of such mystics as Emanuel Swedenborg and Jakob Böhme were sources to which the New England Transcendentalists turned in their search for a liberating philosophy.

Eclectic and cosmopolitan in its sources and part of the Romantic movement, New England Transcendentalism originated in the area around Concord, Mass., and from 1830 to 1855 represented a battle between the younger and older generations and the emergence of a new national culture based on native materials. It attracted such diverse and highly individualistic figures as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Margaret Fuller, Orestes Brownson, Elizabeth Palmer Peabody, and James Freeman Clarke, as well as George Ripley, Bronson Alcott, the younger W.E. Channing, and W.H. Channing. In 1840 Emerson and Margaret Fuller founded The Dial (1840–44), the prototypal “little magazine” wherein some of the best writings by minor Transcendentalists appeared. The writings of the Transcendentalists and those of contemporaries such as Walt Whitman, Herman Melville, and Nathaniel Hawthorne, for whom they prepared the ground, represent the first flowering of the American artistic genius and introduced the American Renaissance in literature.

In their religious quest, the Transcendentalists rejected the conventions of 18th-century thought; and what began in a dissatisfaction with Unitarianism developed into a repudiation of the whole established order. They were leaders in such contemporary reform movements as anarchistic, socialistic, and communistic schemes for living (Thoreau; Alcott at Fruitlands; Ripley at Brook Farm); suffrage for women; better conditions for workers; temperance for all; modifications of dress and diet; the rise of free religion; educational innovation; and other humanitarian causes.

Heavily indebted to the Transcendentalists' organic philosophy, aesthetics, and democratic aspirations have been the pragmatism of William James and John Dewey, the environmental planning of Benton MacKaye and Lewis Mumford, the architecture (and writings) of Louis Sullivan and Frank Lloyd Wright, and the American "modernism" in the arts promoted by Alfred Stieglitz.


"Transcendentalism." Encyclopædia Britannica Ultimate Reference Suite, 2013.

Later on, Western humanity is confronted by an extension of Nativism, Occultism and Transcendentalism via contemplations of the philosophers Husserl and Heidegger, wherein we come face to face with yet another me- my: self- I concentration of exploration, explanation and defined derivations:

Foundations of phenomenology

The phenomenological movement was founded by the German philosopher Edmund Husserl, whose influence on other philosophers drawn to phenomenology was both positive and negative. He wanted to advance beyond the work of Descartes by developing a “pure” concept of consciousness that would not be understood as a kind of thing or substance nor described with inappropriate metaphors (such as impression) from the natural world. In order to block all such false assimilations, Husserl held that it was necessary to set aside the very existence of the natural world—not in the sense of denying it outright but rather in the sense of not assuming it as a given or counting on it for the purpose of describing consciousness. What would be left to work with would be states of pure consciousness—states that, under normal conditions, are largely directed toward what exists in the world but which for these purposes must be taken simply as what is thought—that is, as meanings.

The exclusion of the natural world from this inquiry into consciousness also applied to the human self as an inhabitant of that world. This was the “empirical” self—the one with a name and a birthday and all kinds of involvements in the natural world. Husserl contrasted this everyday empirical self with a “transcendental” self—one that is more or less identical with the pure consciousness that is left by the exclusions he called for. It has been purged of everything that tends to confuse it with the body or anything else that is physical in character. The transcendental self is also the form of consciousness that registers whatever truths are accessible to humans about the world and about themselves. As such, it cannot be subject to any external or causal influence, because such influence would itself be registered by this transcendental consciousness.

Although Husserl insisted that his reduction of the world to its role in consciousness was purely methodological, he never canceled the suspension of belief that this reduction required. As a result, no status ever accrued to natural reality other than that to which it had been reduced—the status, namely, of something meant by pure consciousness. Although Husserl wanted to avoid a Cartesian dualism of mind and body, he spoke of a “sphere of immanence” that contained everything that belonged to consciousness. This sounded remarkably like what was supposed to have been “in” the mind as a mental substance under the Cartesian dispensation. Moreover, such a transcendental subject would plainly not itself be in the world whose existence it was suspending; thus another feature of dualism was reproduced in Husserl's philosophy. It is hardly surprising that he eventually described his own thought as “transcendental idealism.”

Heidegger and humanism

Rejecting this kind of transcendentalism, the thinkers who followed Husserl came to be known as “existential” phenomenologists, because they treated the existence of the natural world as the great incontestable datum for their analysis of consciousness. Without doubt, the most original and influential among them was Martin Heidegger. Any temptation to classify him as sympathetic to humanistic or anthropological concerns, however, was negated by his Letter on Humanism (1947), which he wrote in response to a lecture by the French existentialist Jean-Paul Sartre. Sartre had argued that existential philosophy of the kind he had appropriated in good part from Heidegger had a humanistic character. Heidegger repudiated this suggestion by identifying humanism with a seriously deficient account of human being that reduces humankind to the status of an entity of a special kind. Heidegger also made it very clear that his own work should not be confused with philosophical anthropology. Yet, at the same time and in the same essay, he appeared willing to reinstate the honorifics that he believed the proponents of humanism had improperly applied to a misconceived human nature, provided that that nature was correctly understood in the terms he was himself proposing.

Paradoxical as it may seem, this invites the thought that Heidegger's critique of humanism—and, by implication, of philosophical anthropology itself—can serve constructive rather than destructive purposes. The question thus posed is whether Heidegger's conception of human being can replace the flawed conceptual apparatus on which philosophical anthropology has relied and thereby provide it with a means of handling its current crisis more effectively.

The concept of Dasein

For Heidegger, the human subject had to be reconceived in an altogether new way, as “being-in-the-world.” Because this notion represented the very opposite of the Cartesian “thing that thinks,” the idea of consciousness as representing the mind's internal awareness of its own states had to be dropped. With it went the assumption that specific mental states were needed to mediate the relation of the mind to everything outside it. The human subject was not a mind that was capable only of representing the world to itself and whose linkage with its body was merely a contingent one. According to Heidegger, human being should instead be conceived as Dasein, a common German word usually translated in English as “existence” but which also literally means “being there.” By using it as a replacement for “consciousness” and “mind,” Heidegger intended to suggest that a human being is in the world in the mode of “uncovering” and is thus disclosing other entities as well as itself. Dasein is, in other words, the “there”—or the locus—of being and thus the metaphorical place where entities “show themselves” as what they are. Instead of being sealed off within a specially designed compartment within a human being, the functions that have been misdescribed as “mental” now become the defining characteristics of human existence.

There is one major difference between Heidegger's account of human being and the humanistic inspiration of much philosophical anthropology. In his early work Being and Time (1927), Heidegger had interpreted the disclosive function of Dasein as being closely bound up with its own active character and with the anticipatory temporality—its being referentially always “out ahead of itself”—that differs so significantly from the sequential character of world-time. This strongly pragmatic strain later yielded to a conception of the access to being as a kind of gift that humans are privileged to receive. There are also strong suggestions in his later writings that his earlier view had been contaminated by a certain subjectivist tendency—the idea that man is quite literally the “measure of all things” and, as such, the designer and author of being itself rather than its humble recipient.

It is plain that any humanism associated with Heidegger would necessarily avoid the heroic rhetoric that so often celebrated the uniqueness of “man” in the past. No traditional humanism, however, could endorse his conception of the near-complete passivity of humans in their commerce with being, and in this light it may be the case that not Heidegger but Sartre was closer to the authentic spirit of humanism.

What is perhaps most interesting about Heidegger's concept of Dasein is that it is a concept of a human being as a whole rather than of a mind or of a human being as a compound of mind and body. The primary significance of this unitary treatment of human being is that it does not sequester the principal functions of a human being in a rather mysteriously conceived part thereof. This represents a genuine alternative to both the body-cum-soul conception of human being and to the straightforward identification of human beings with their bodies, which is the approach taken by most contemporary philosophers.


  • Frederick A. Olafson- Emeritus Professor of Philosophy, University of California, San Diego. Author of Heidegger and the Philosophy of Mind and others.

philosophical anthropology." Encyclopædia Britannica Ultimate Reference Suite, 2013.

With respect to Transcendentalism, I am using it in the 1st part of the third example of the follow three alternatives from the Merriam-Weber dictionary definition, which actually treats it if it is three different places or realities... like having three separate dimensions, so-to-speak:

Transcendentalism \ n (1803)

  1. a philosophy that emphasizes the a priori conditions of knowledge and experience or the unknowable character of ultimate reality or that emphasizes the transcendent as the fundamental reality.
  2. a philosophy that asserts the primacy of the spiritual and transcendental over the material and empirical.
  3. the quality or state of being transcendental; esp: visionary idealism.

I tentatively see the idea of transcendence as three states of being:

  • The conscious reality which existed as a transcendental edifice of consideration by those ancient peoples who were primarily unconscious but a view had a developing brain by which to perceive a greater conscious state of being (perhaps initially thought of in spiritual terms) that we recognize as normalcy today, but that the normalcy of consciousness in the past apparently was what we of today would call schizophrenic or some other mental illness.
  • The notion and lingering experience of a former transcendental consideration (as that from the largely unconscious or animal orientation to that of the later but early stages of a consciousness characteristic of later humans); promoted the idea that another transcendent edifice existed and that this place was that of a god or gods and later labeled as heaven, though prior labels existed.
  • These two then lead to the consideration of yet another realm of transcendental possibility sometimes referred to as a dimension, or state of pure energy, or that which human language can neither label nor give articulation to in the present stage of human evolution.

In speaking of Transcendentalism, one necessarily confronts a consideration of existence, sometimes labeled Existentialism, but that I do not defer a consideration thereof with respect to the explanations of duality:

Existentialism \ n (1941): a chiefly 20th century philosophical movement embracing diverse doctrines but centering on analysis of individual existence in an unfathomable universe and the plight of the individual who must assume ultimate responsibility for acts of free will without any certain knowledge of what is right or wrong or good or bad.

I will pursue a larger representation of Existentialism on the next page.

Date of Origination: 21 Jan 2020... 1:24 AM Tuesday


Date of Origination: Tuesday, January 21st 2020... 1:24 AM
Initial Posting: Saturday, February 1st, 2020... 1:35 PM



Your Questions, Comments or Additional Information are welcomed:
Herb O. Buckland
herbobuckland@hotmail.com